A framework for how expertise is communicated and valued in contemporary organizations: Why process work matters

Jeffrey W. Treem, William Barley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Changes in contemporary organizations and work environments suggest reconsideration of how expertise is constituted in organizations. Specifically, a communicative view of expertise is advanced that views expertise in organizations as the product of communicative signals that are associated with an actor, and attributed as expertise by an observer. This lens is discussed as particularly valuable given the ways communication technologies and distributed work arrangements obscure visibility into the work practices of individuals, and the ways communication alters assessments of expertise. Two distinctively communicative forms of expertise are presented as alternatives to more traditional domain-focused views of expertise: interactional expertise and process expertise. A framework is presented for how organizational communication scholars can study process expertise, and how this research will help build and extend theory related to the constitutive nature of expertise in organizations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTransformative Practice and Research in Organizational Communication
EditorsPhilip J Salem, Erik Timmerman
PublisherIGI Global
Pages130-148
Number of pages19
ISBN (Electronic)9781522528241
ISBN (Print)1522528237, 9781522528234
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018

Fingerprint

Expertise
Distributed work
Work environment
Organizational communication
Communication
Work practices
Observer
Interaction
Visibility
Communication technologies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Treem, J. W., & Barley, W. (2018). A framework for how expertise is communicated and valued in contemporary organizations: Why process work matters. In P. J. Salem, & E. Timmerman (Eds.), Transformative Practice and Research in Organizational Communication (pp. 130-148). IGI Global. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-5225-2823-4.ch008

A framework for how expertise is communicated and valued in contemporary organizations : Why process work matters. / Treem, Jeffrey W.; Barley, William.

Transformative Practice and Research in Organizational Communication. ed. / Philip J Salem; Erik Timmerman. IGI Global, 2018. p. 130-148.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Treem, JW & Barley, W 2018, A framework for how expertise is communicated and valued in contemporary organizations: Why process work matters. in PJ Salem & E Timmerman (eds), Transformative Practice and Research in Organizational Communication. IGI Global, pp. 130-148. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-5225-2823-4.ch008
Treem JW, Barley W. A framework for how expertise is communicated and valued in contemporary organizations: Why process work matters. In Salem PJ, Timmerman E, editors, Transformative Practice and Research in Organizational Communication. IGI Global. 2018. p. 130-148 https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-5225-2823-4.ch008
Treem, Jeffrey W. ; Barley, William. / A framework for how expertise is communicated and valued in contemporary organizations : Why process work matters. Transformative Practice and Research in Organizational Communication. editor / Philip J Salem ; Erik Timmerman. IGI Global, 2018. pp. 130-148
@inbook{c76e7b3bf9e34f378e2f866a92e54cd7,
title = "A framework for how expertise is communicated and valued in contemporary organizations: Why process work matters",
abstract = "Changes in contemporary organizations and work environments suggest reconsideration of how expertise is constituted in organizations. Specifically, a communicative view of expertise is advanced that views expertise in organizations as the product of communicative signals that are associated with an actor, and attributed as expertise by an observer. This lens is discussed as particularly valuable given the ways communication technologies and distributed work arrangements obscure visibility into the work practices of individuals, and the ways communication alters assessments of expertise. Two distinctively communicative forms of expertise are presented as alternatives to more traditional domain-focused views of expertise: interactional expertise and process expertise. A framework is presented for how organizational communication scholars can study process expertise, and how this research will help build and extend theory related to the constitutive nature of expertise in organizations.",
author = "Treem, {Jeffrey W.} and William Barley",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.4018/978-1-5225-2823-4.ch008",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "1522528237",
pages = "130--148",
editor = "Salem, {Philip J} and Erik Timmerman",
booktitle = "Transformative Practice and Research in Organizational Communication",
publisher = "IGI Global",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - A framework for how expertise is communicated and valued in contemporary organizations

T2 - Why process work matters

AU - Treem, Jeffrey W.

AU - Barley, William

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Changes in contemporary organizations and work environments suggest reconsideration of how expertise is constituted in organizations. Specifically, a communicative view of expertise is advanced that views expertise in organizations as the product of communicative signals that are associated with an actor, and attributed as expertise by an observer. This lens is discussed as particularly valuable given the ways communication technologies and distributed work arrangements obscure visibility into the work practices of individuals, and the ways communication alters assessments of expertise. Two distinctively communicative forms of expertise are presented as alternatives to more traditional domain-focused views of expertise: interactional expertise and process expertise. A framework is presented for how organizational communication scholars can study process expertise, and how this research will help build and extend theory related to the constitutive nature of expertise in organizations.

AB - Changes in contemporary organizations and work environments suggest reconsideration of how expertise is constituted in organizations. Specifically, a communicative view of expertise is advanced that views expertise in organizations as the product of communicative signals that are associated with an actor, and attributed as expertise by an observer. This lens is discussed as particularly valuable given the ways communication technologies and distributed work arrangements obscure visibility into the work practices of individuals, and the ways communication alters assessments of expertise. Two distinctively communicative forms of expertise are presented as alternatives to more traditional domain-focused views of expertise: interactional expertise and process expertise. A framework is presented for how organizational communication scholars can study process expertise, and how this research will help build and extend theory related to the constitutive nature of expertise in organizations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85028727679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85028727679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4018/978-1-5225-2823-4.ch008

DO - 10.4018/978-1-5225-2823-4.ch008

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:85028727679

SN - 1522528237

SN - 9781522528234

SP - 130

EP - 148

BT - Transformative Practice and Research in Organizational Communication

A2 - Salem, Philip J

A2 - Timmerman, Erik

PB - IGI Global

ER -