A dietary phytochemical alters caste-associated gene expression in honey bees

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the eusocial honey bee Apis mellifera, with reproductive queens and sterile workers, a female larva's developmental fate depends on its diet; nurse bees feed queen-destined larvae exclusively royal jelly, a glandular secretion, but worker-destined larvae receive royal jelly for 3 days and subsequently jelly to which honey and beebread are added. RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that p-coumaric acid, which is ubiquitous in honey and beebread, differentially regulates genes involved in caste determination. Rearing larvae in vitro on a royal jelly diet to which p-coumaric acid has been added produces adults with reduced ovary development. Thus, consuming royal jelly exclusively not only enriches the diet of queen-destined larvae but also may protect them from inhibitory effects of phytochemicals present in the honey and beebread fed to worker-destined larvae.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1500795
JournalScience Advances
Volume1
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2015

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Honey
Bees
Phytochemicals
Social Class
Larva
Propolis
Gene Expression
Diet
Ovary
Nurses
RNA
royal jelly
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A dietary phytochemical alters caste-associated gene expression in honey bees. / Mao, Wenfu; Schuler, Mary A; Berenbaum, May R.

In: Science Advances, Vol. 1, No. 7, e1500795, 08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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