A confocal microscopy-based atlas of tissue architecture in the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta

Tania Rozario, Phillip A. Newmark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Tapeworms are pervasive and globally distributed parasites that infect millions of humans and livestock every year, and are the causative agents of two of the 17 neglected tropical diseases prioritized by the World Health Organization. Studies of tapeworm biology and pathology are often encumbered by the complex life cycles of disease-relevant tapeworm species that infect hosts such as foxes, dogs, cattle, pigs, and humans. Thus, studies of laboratory models can help overcome the practical, ethical, and cost-related difficulties faced by tapeworm parasitologists. The rat intestinal tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta is easily reared in the laboratory and has the potential to enable modern molecular-based experiments that will greatly contribute to our understanding of multiple aspects of tapeworm biology, such as growth and reproduction. As part of our efforts to develop molecular tools for experiments on H. diminuta, we have characterized a battery of lectins, antibodies, and common stains that label different tapeworm tissues and organ structures. Using confocal microscopy, we have assembled an "atlas" of H. diminuta organ architecture that will be a useful resource for helminthologists. The methodologies we describe will facilitate characterization of loss-of-function perturbations using H. diminuta. This toolkit will enable a greater understanding of fundamental tapeworm biology that may elucidate new therapeutic targets toward the eradication of these parasites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-41
Number of pages11
JournalExperimental Parasitology
Volume158
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Keywords

  • Cestoda
  • Flatworm
  • Hymenolepis diminuta
  • Lectin
  • Platyhelminthes
  • Tapeworm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

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