A comparison of alternative obstacle avoidance strategies for vehicle control

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

In Alleyne (1996) several vehicle control options were considered for Unintended Roadway Departure (URD) prevention and conclusions were drawn as to the efficacy of each method. This companion paper investigates the use of several different inputs for the control of a vehicle, in the context of Obstacle Avoidance for autonomous vehicles. In this investigation, the goal of the controller is to provide an intervention in the event of the vehicle detecting an obstacle in its path. The five types of inputs that will be considered are (i) Four Wheel Steering; (ii) Front Wheel Steering; (iii) Four Wheel Brake Steering; (iv) Front Wheel Brake Steering; and (v) Rear Wheel Brake Steering. The controller design is an LQ controller based on the simplified dynamics of a 2 degree of freedom bicycle model. However the analysis of the different strategies are performed on a more complete, nonlinear vehicle model. A key contribution of this paper is the quantitative evaluation of the relative efficiencies of each of these input strategies being examined. Unlike most control schemes, an important metric of performance is the ratio of peak tire force used versus available tire force. The conclusions reached in this paper shed additional light on appropriate input actuator methods for vehicle guidance and control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-392
Number of pages22
JournalVehicle System Dynamics
Volume27
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1997

Fingerprint

Collision avoidance
Wheels
Brakes
Tires
Controllers
Four wheel steering
Bicycles
Degrees of freedom (mechanics)
Actuators

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

A comparison of alternative obstacle avoidance strategies for vehicle control. / Alleyne, Andrew G.

In: Vehicle System Dynamics, Vol. 27, No. 5-6, 06.1997, p. 371-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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