A combined modeling and experimental study assessing the impact of fluid pulsation on charge and energy efficiency in capacitive deionization

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cell-cycling performance in capacitive deionization (CDI) can suffer from various charge-efficiency loss mechanisms. In conventional CDI, we show that salt residue within electrodes introduces a temporal lag between charge and desalination stages of a CDI cycle. Without accounting for this effect in the collection of effluent, significant performance degradation occurs as current density increases. To overcome this we use pulse-flow operation to control fresh- and brine-water concentrations. The charge and energy efficiency performance between the two flow-modes is compared using a porous electrode model that is calibrated and validated with experimental data. To quantify specific contributions to charge efficiency losses, themodel captures local salt variations resulting from a combination of electrosorption, leakage current, and immobile surface charge. Compared to traditional continuous-flow operation, simulation results show that charge efficiency increases up to 23% in the pulse-flow operation at a current density up to 20 A/m2, which leads to a 73% decrease of specific energy consumption (SEC). In addition, the SEC predicted by the pulse-flow operation model closely aligns with the predictions of the continuous-flow model after accounting for the temporal lag in effluent salinity. Both simulations and experimental results suggest that pulse-flow operation closely approximates the performance in continuous-flow operation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E536-E547
JournalJournal of the Electrochemical Society
Volume164
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Electrochemistry
  • Materials Chemistry

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