A closer look: Socio-structural influences on teacher–child interactions during project work

Tanya Espinosa Cordoba, Stephanie C. Sanders-Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An increasing amount of attention and public funding has been dedicated in recent years to the field of Early Childhood Education and the expansion of early childhood programs in the United States. Program quality in early childhood is evaluated based on program-level structural features and instructional support (e.g. problem solving, feedback, and language modeling), but quantifiable measures of structural and process features do not necessarily equate to quality instructional interactions. Questions remain about the presence and strength of socially constructed power dynamics found in pedagogic practice. This case study seeks to illuminate interactions between children and teachers in federally funded Head Start classrooms, teachers’ views of children, and influences to novice project work using the Project Approach. The project work served as a frame for viewing interactions between teachers and children as mediated by varying degrees of power and control of teacher–child interactions at the classroom level (identified as “socio-structures”). Questions investigated were the following: (1) What are the socio-structures inside these Head Start classrooms before and during the implementation of the Project Approach? (2) How do existing socio-structures relate to teacher–child instructional language interactions during the implementation of the Project Approach?

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)407-420
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Early Childhood Research
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Keywords

  • democracy
  • early childhood curriculum
  • head start
  • participation
  • teacher–child relationships

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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