A Brazilian counterweight: Music, intellectual property and the African Diaspora in Rio de Janeiro (1910s-1930s)

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Abstract

This article treats Tio Faustino, a little-known samba musician and Afro-Brazilian religious leader living in Rio de Janeiro, as an entry point for exploring larger questions about Brazil and the African Diaspora. The inquiry expands outward from Tio Faustino to Rio's early twentieth-century markets in African commodities, the city's nascent music industry and the growing call to defend intellectual property rights in Brazil. In order to advance their careers, Tio Faustino and other artists accessed nationalist sentiment in ways that highlighted differences rather than commonalities with African-descended peoples elsewhere. In this way, Brazil's global standing and its colonial history and post-colonial trajectory functioned as a counterweight to transnational and diasporic connections. These findings deepen, rather than completely unseat, recent trends in diaspora and transnational studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)695-722
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Latin American Studies
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African Diaspora
  • Brazil
  • Intellectual property
  • Music
  • Rio de Janeiro
  • Samba

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

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