A brain-machine interface to navigate mobile robots along human-like paths amidst obstacles

Abdullah Akce, James Norton, Timothy Bretl

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper presents an interface that allows a human user to specify a desired path for a mobile robot in a planar workspace with noisy binary inputs that are obtained at low bit-rates through an electroencephalograph (EEG). We represent desired paths as geodesics with respect to a cost function that is defined so that each path-homotopy class contains exactly one (local) geodesic. We apply max-margin structured learning to recover a cost function that is consistent with observations of human walking paths. We derive an optimal feedback communication protocol to select a local geodesic - equivalently, a path-homotopy class - using a sequence of noisy bits. We validate our approach with experiments that quantify both how well our learned cost function characterizes human walking data and how well human subjects perform with the resulting interface in navigating a simulated robot with EEG.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2012 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2012
Pages4084-4089
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Event25th IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Robotics and Intelligent Systems, IROS 2012 - Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal
Duration: Oct 7 2012Oct 12 2012

Publication series

NameIEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems
ISSN (Print)2153-0858
ISSN (Electronic)2153-0866

Other

Other25th IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Robotics and Intelligent Systems, IROS 2012
CountryPortugal
CityVilamoura, Algarve
Period10/7/1210/12/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Software
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Computer Science Applications

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  • Cite this

    Akce, A., Norton, J., & Bretl, T. (2012). A brain-machine interface to navigate mobile robots along human-like paths amidst obstacles. In 2012 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2012 (pp. 4084-4089). [6386024] (IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems). https://doi.org/10.1109/IROS.2012.6386024