A boarder, a widow, and a tenant sit down for dinner: Foodway comparisons in the Goose Hill neighborhood, east St. Louis, Illinois

Claire P. Dappert-Coonrod, Steven R Kuehn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During the turn of the twentieth century, the Goose Hill neighborhood in East St. Louis, Illinois, was predominantly a working-class population largely employed at the National Stockyards and its related industries. Many people in Goose Hill lived in multifamily homes or rentals, though a few did own homes. In this study, foodways comparisons between inhabitants of a boardinghouse, a long-term stable household, and a high-turnover tenancy highlight differences and similarities between such divergent types of households. It also illustrates and provides a discussion of priorities and consumer preferences within each household. This case study presents one viable way in which such a methodological framework can be used to approach interpretation of turn-of-the-twentiethcentury urban archaeological sites and assemblages. It also highlights the strengths and shortcomings of such a multievidentiary approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-36
Number of pages33
JournalMidcontinental Journal of Archaeology
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • Boardinghouse
  • Consumer choice
  • Fauna
  • Foodways

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Archaeology
  • Archaeology

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