2-Undecyloxy-1-ethanol in combination with other semiochemicals attracts three Monochamus species (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in British Columbia, Canada

Jorge E. MacIas-Samano, David Wakarchuk, Jocelyn G. Millar, Lawrence M. Hanks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two species in the genus Monochamus Dejean (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) have recently been shown to have the same male-produced sex pheromone, 2-undecyloxy-1-ethanol (monochamol), suggesting that other congeners may share the same pheromone. We tested that hypothesis by conducting field bioassays of monochamol, in combination with bark-beetle pheromones and the host plant volatiles ethanol and α-pinene, in southern British Columbia, Canada. We captured 603 Monochamus clamator (LeConte), 63 Monochamus obtusus Casey, 245 Monochamus scutellatus (Say) (tribe Monochamini), and 42 Acanthocinus princeps (Walker) (tribe Acanthocinini). All three Monochamus species were significantly attracted to the combination of monochamol and host plant volatiles, whereas bark-beetle pheromones plus plant volatiles and plant volatiles alone were minimally attractive. Adding bark-beetle pheromones to the monochamol plus plant volatiles treatment synergised attraction of M. clamator, but not the other two Monochamus species. Acanthocinus princeps was most strongly attracted to the combination of bark-beetle pheromones and plant volatiles, and did not appear to be affected by the presence or absence of monochamol in baits. We conclude that monochamol is a likely pheromone component for the three Monochamus species, and that monochamol plus host plant volatiles is an effective attractant for these and perhaps other North American Monochamus species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)821-825
Number of pages5
JournalCanadian Entomologist
Volume144
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

Fingerprint

Monochamus
semiochemical
semiochemicals
British Columbia
Cerambycidae
Pheromones
Beetles
pheromone
Canada
ethanol
pheromones
Coleoptera
bark beetles
bark
beetle
host plant
host plants
Monochamus scutellatus
attractant
sex pheromone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Structural Biology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Insect Science

Cite this

2-Undecyloxy-1-ethanol in combination with other semiochemicals attracts three Monochamus species (Coleoptera : Cerambycidae) in British Columbia, Canada. / MacIas-Samano, Jorge E.; Wakarchuk, David; Millar, Jocelyn G.; Hanks, Lawrence M.

In: Canadian Entomologist, Vol. 144, No. 6, 01.12.2012, p. 821-825.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5a62e250749c45f2807de9a8698a5d5a,
title = "2-Undecyloxy-1-ethanol in combination with other semiochemicals attracts three Monochamus species (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in British Columbia, Canada",
abstract = "Two species in the genus Monochamus Dejean (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) have recently been shown to have the same male-produced sex pheromone, 2-undecyloxy-1-ethanol (monochamol), suggesting that other congeners may share the same pheromone. We tested that hypothesis by conducting field bioassays of monochamol, in combination with bark-beetle pheromones and the host plant volatiles ethanol and α-pinene, in southern British Columbia, Canada. We captured 603 Monochamus clamator (LeConte), 63 Monochamus obtusus Casey, 245 Monochamus scutellatus (Say) (tribe Monochamini), and 42 Acanthocinus princeps (Walker) (tribe Acanthocinini). All three Monochamus species were significantly attracted to the combination of monochamol and host plant volatiles, whereas bark-beetle pheromones plus plant volatiles and plant volatiles alone were minimally attractive. Adding bark-beetle pheromones to the monochamol plus plant volatiles treatment synergised attraction of M. clamator, but not the other two Monochamus species. Acanthocinus princeps was most strongly attracted to the combination of bark-beetle pheromones and plant volatiles, and did not appear to be affected by the presence or absence of monochamol in baits. We conclude that monochamol is a likely pheromone component for the three Monochamus species, and that monochamol plus host plant volatiles is an effective attractant for these and perhaps other North American Monochamus species.",
author = "MacIas-Samano, {Jorge E.} and David Wakarchuk and Millar, {Jocelyn G.} and Hanks, {Lawrence M.}",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4039/tce.2012.77",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "144",
pages = "821--825",
journal = "Canadian Entomologist",
issn = "0008-347X",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - 2-Undecyloxy-1-ethanol in combination with other semiochemicals attracts three Monochamus species (Coleoptera

T2 - Cerambycidae) in British Columbia, Canada

AU - MacIas-Samano, Jorge E.

AU - Wakarchuk, David

AU - Millar, Jocelyn G.

AU - Hanks, Lawrence M.

PY - 2012/12/1

Y1 - 2012/12/1

N2 - Two species in the genus Monochamus Dejean (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) have recently been shown to have the same male-produced sex pheromone, 2-undecyloxy-1-ethanol (monochamol), suggesting that other congeners may share the same pheromone. We tested that hypothesis by conducting field bioassays of monochamol, in combination with bark-beetle pheromones and the host plant volatiles ethanol and α-pinene, in southern British Columbia, Canada. We captured 603 Monochamus clamator (LeConte), 63 Monochamus obtusus Casey, 245 Monochamus scutellatus (Say) (tribe Monochamini), and 42 Acanthocinus princeps (Walker) (tribe Acanthocinini). All three Monochamus species were significantly attracted to the combination of monochamol and host plant volatiles, whereas bark-beetle pheromones plus plant volatiles and plant volatiles alone were minimally attractive. Adding bark-beetle pheromones to the monochamol plus plant volatiles treatment synergised attraction of M. clamator, but not the other two Monochamus species. Acanthocinus princeps was most strongly attracted to the combination of bark-beetle pheromones and plant volatiles, and did not appear to be affected by the presence or absence of monochamol in baits. We conclude that monochamol is a likely pheromone component for the three Monochamus species, and that monochamol plus host plant volatiles is an effective attractant for these and perhaps other North American Monochamus species.

AB - Two species in the genus Monochamus Dejean (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae) have recently been shown to have the same male-produced sex pheromone, 2-undecyloxy-1-ethanol (monochamol), suggesting that other congeners may share the same pheromone. We tested that hypothesis by conducting field bioassays of monochamol, in combination with bark-beetle pheromones and the host plant volatiles ethanol and α-pinene, in southern British Columbia, Canada. We captured 603 Monochamus clamator (LeConte), 63 Monochamus obtusus Casey, 245 Monochamus scutellatus (Say) (tribe Monochamini), and 42 Acanthocinus princeps (Walker) (tribe Acanthocinini). All three Monochamus species were significantly attracted to the combination of monochamol and host plant volatiles, whereas bark-beetle pheromones plus plant volatiles and plant volatiles alone were minimally attractive. Adding bark-beetle pheromones to the monochamol plus plant volatiles treatment synergised attraction of M. clamator, but not the other two Monochamus species. Acanthocinus princeps was most strongly attracted to the combination of bark-beetle pheromones and plant volatiles, and did not appear to be affected by the presence or absence of monochamol in baits. We conclude that monochamol is a likely pheromone component for the three Monochamus species, and that monochamol plus host plant volatiles is an effective attractant for these and perhaps other North American Monochamus species.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84871367343&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84871367343&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4039/tce.2012.77

DO - 10.4039/tce.2012.77

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84871367343

VL - 144

SP - 821

EP - 825

JO - Canadian Entomologist

JF - Canadian Entomologist

SN - 0008-347X

IS - 6

ER -