[18] Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Biological and Model Membrane Systems

D. Chapman, Eric Oldfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a technique in which nulcei with spin I ≥ 1/2 absorb radiofrequency energy of a particular frequency, in a magnetic field. For a given external magnetic field strength, different nuclei absorb energy at different frequencies. Thus it is possible to study, for example, carbon-13 or phosphorus-31 nuclei in a complex biochemical system, all other nuclei in the system remaining “transparent.” The shape and width of an NMR absorption line, and the magnitude of its relaxation times, can all give interesting information on the mobility of the group containing the nucleus under observation, and this can lead to a better understanding of molecular mobility in complex systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-211
Number of pages14
JournalMethods in enzymology
Volume32
Issue numberC
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1974
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biological Models
Magnetic Fields
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Magnetic fields
Membranes
Relaxation time
Phosphorus
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
Large scale systems
Carbon
Observation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

[18] Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Biological and Model Membrane Systems. / Chapman, D.; Oldfield, Eric.

In: Methods in enzymology, Vol. 32, No. C, 01.01.1974, p. 198-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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