11th AMS conference on satellite meteorology and oceanography

Christopher Velden, Larry DiGirolamo, Mary Glackin, Jeffrey Hawkins, Gary Jedlovec, Lee Thomas, Grant Petty, Robert Plante, Anthony Reale, John Zapotocny

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The American Meteorological Society (AMS) held its 11th Conference on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography at the Monona Terrace Convention Center in Madison, Wisconsin, during 15-18 October 2001. The purpose of the conference, typically held every 18 months, is to promote a forum for AMS membership, international scientists, and student members to present and discuss the latest advances in satellite remote sensing for meteorological and oceanographical applications. This year, surrounded by inspirational designs by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright, the meeting focused on several broad topics related to remote sensing from space, including environmental applications of land and oceanic remote sensing, climatology and long-term satellite data studies, operational applications, radiances and retrievals, and new technology and methods. A vision of an increasing convergence of satellite systems emerged that included operational and research satellite programs and interdisciplinary user groups. The conference also hosted NASA's Electronic Theater, which was presented to groups of middle and high school students totaling over 5500. It was truly a successful public outreach event. The conference banquet was held on the final evening, where a short tribute to satellite pioneer Verner Suomi was given by Joanne Simpson. Suomi was responsible for establishing the Space Science and Engineering Center at the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1645-1648+1560
JournalBulletin of the American Meteorological Society
Volume83
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 2002

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science

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